fbpx

Author: DOLLS Magazine Contributor

How Vogue’s Ginny Got Her Big Sister Jill

Jenny Graves embarked on a life-changing journey in 1922 when she joined a small number of other creative women in opening the Vogue Doll Shoppe. Born Jenny Adler in 1890, she was accustomed to designing outfits both for family members and their dolls. She’d already faced more than one challenge in her life — her father died when she was 15, and she put her dreams on hold to help support her family. She married William H. Graves in 1913 and gave birth to three children.

Read More

Curious Collector: Mattel Barbie RN Repro

Q: I am a retired nurse and I remember the original Barbie registered nurse outfit. I learned that a Barbie doll and the outfit had been reissued, but I didn’t know it at the time. Fortunately I found one on eBay. I was very pleased with it. There were a few listed, and prices varied considerably. I was wondering if you could comment on this?

Read More

All Dressed Up: Barbie Dressed Box Dolls Are Rare Finds Today

Over a million Barbie dolls had been sold by 1962, according to a Mattel press release. This is just three years after Barbie was introduced at the 1959 Toy Fair. In an interview with Elliot Handler, one of the founders of Mattel, in 1986, he told me even he was unconvinced that Barbie would be a success.

Read More

Jozef Szekeres Takes GlamourOZ Fashion-Doll Designs to New Heights

Jozef Szekeres is an artistic triple threat: comic-book illustrator, Disney animator, and high-fashion doll designer. It’s the latter, however, that’s his passion and primary focus. The Sydney, Australia, resident introduced his first dolls, the stunning Elizabet and Kolatin Bizelle sisters, in 2003. On the heels of an unplanned hiatus, he revisited his original concept and released the GlamourOZ Doll line in 2020.

Read More

Curious Collector: 1946 Margaret O’Brien Doll

Q: I won this stunning 21-inch composition Margaret O’Brien doll by Madame Alexander at an auction. The original owner had purchased the doll new in the original box with the clover wrist tag that said Margaret O’Brien. For some reason, the previous owner discarded the box and the wrist tag but kept the doll in a glass cabinet. Her son had put the doll up for auction. She is flawless, and the dress is tagged Margaret O’Brien. I also have a Margaret O’Brien Madame Alexander doll in hard plastic, and I was wondering when the change from composition to hard plastic occurred?

Read More

Cindee Moyer Makes Her Mark in Multiple Careers

Before she became a full-time doll artist, Cindee Moyer was a human resources manager for a manufacturing company in Iowa for 15 years. One of her accomplishments she’s most proud of was integrating refugees into the company’s workforce. At the time, Iowa was processing large numbers of refugees from Bosnia, Vietnam, and Sudan. “Our company was expanding rapidly, so working with the Bureau of Refugee Services, I was able to hire 30 refugees in the first month — and that was just the beginning,” Moyer said.

Read More

Ideal’s Tiny Kissy Born During a Time of Innovation in Dolls

The early 1960s were a time of rapid change in the toy world, particularly when it comes to dolls. The doll market included toys designed for children as young as 3 years old up to 14 years, from baby dolls and toddlers — some made to be life-sized, like Ideal’s 42-inch Daddy’s Girl — to adult-figured fashion dolls. But the whole market was in the midst of a shakeup.

Read More

Famous Queens and Martha Washington Paper Dolls

Let’s explore Famous Queens and Martha Washington, a complete boxed set of early portrait paper dolls created by Canadian artist Elizabeth S. Tucker with soft-toned watercolors. In 1895, Frederick A. Stokes and Company in New York used the chromolithography process to print them. Seven women comprise the set: Queen Marie Antoinette from France, Queen Isabella I from Spain, Queen Elizabeth I of England, Queen Louise from Prussia, Queen Victoria from England, Queen Margherita from Italy, and Martha Washington.

Read More

Curious Collector: 1957 Ideal Shirley Temple

Q: A longtime friend of mine recently went through the dolls that her mother left her some time ago. My friend is basically a Madame Alexander collector. She found and gave me this Shirley Temple doll that is dressed in what I presume is the sailor suit from Shirley’s movie Captain January. The doll is about 12 inches tall. She is all vinyl, with rooted hair and sleep eyes, and has her original box as well. I was aware of this fashion being all white and have never seen it in blue, but this one is tagged and obviously is original. What can you tell me?

Read More

Julia Kristal’s Love of Dolls, Art Lead Her to Create Silicone Babies

Julia Kristal has always loved dolls and collected them into adulthood. In college, while she was focused on music and education, she also began learning to draw and loved using colored pencils to draw realistic portraits. She also learned to knit and crochet, and she began making dolls using yarn. When she finally stumbled across reborn dollmaking and sculpting, she had found her niche. Since her love of dolls had never ended, it probably was inevitable that she would eventually become a doll artist.

Read More

Cast of Characters: Esther Manso Sculpts Heroes, Villains of Time-Honored Tales

A catastrophic illness — one that kept her in a medical facility on a respirator for four months — changed Esther Manso’s life and career path in 2010. At the time, she was married, raising a large family, and had been working as a comptroller for a large Miami car dealership — a job she described as rewarding but stressful. Her 30-year career came to an end with her illness.
“It is hard to believe that because of that, I am now able to enjoy my later years in complete happiness and bliss, doing what I was meant to do and what I love the most,” Manso said. “When I became disabled, I taught myself how to sew and make cloth dolls, until I found polymer clay and fell in love. I love how the clay allows me to express myself easier.”

Read More

Free Digital Issue + eNewsletter

Read a free issue, plus get doll-collecting newsletters.

 

CLICK HERE NOW

You have successfully joined our E-mail List!