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Category: Antique Dolls

How Vogue’s Ginny Got Her Big Sister Jill

Jenny Graves embarked on a life-changing journey in 1922 when she joined a small number of other creative women in opening the Vogue Doll Shoppe. Born Jenny Adler in 1890, she was accustomed to designing outfits both for family members and their dolls. She’d already faced more than one challenge in her life — her father died when she was 15, and she put her dreams on hold to help support her family. She married William H. Graves in 1913 and gave birth to three children.

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Curious Collector: Mattel Barbie RN Repro

Q: I am a retired nurse and I remember the original Barbie registered nurse outfit. I learned that a Barbie doll and the outfit had been reissued, but I didn’t know it at the time. Fortunately I found one on eBay. I was very pleased with it. There were a few listed, and prices varied considerably. I was wondering if you could comment on this?

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All Dressed Up: Barbie Dressed Box Dolls Are Rare Finds Today

Over a million Barbie dolls had been sold by 1962, according to a Mattel press release. This is just three years after Barbie was introduced at the 1959 Toy Fair. In an interview with Elliot Handler, one of the founders of Mattel, in 1986, he told me even he was unconvinced that Barbie would be a success.

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Curious Collector: 1946 Margaret O’Brien Doll

Q: I won this stunning 21-inch composition Margaret O’Brien doll by Madame Alexander at an auction. The original owner had purchased the doll new in the original box with the clover wrist tag that said Margaret O’Brien. For some reason, the previous owner discarded the box and the wrist tag but kept the doll in a glass cabinet. Her son had put the doll up for auction. She is flawless, and the dress is tagged Margaret O’Brien. I also have a Margaret O’Brien Madame Alexander doll in hard plastic, and I was wondering when the change from composition to hard plastic occurred?

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Ideal’s Tiny Kissy Born During a Time of Innovation in Dolls

The early 1960s were a time of rapid change in the toy world, particularly when it comes to dolls. The doll market included toys designed for children as young as 3 years old up to 14 years, from baby dolls and toddlers — some made to be life-sized, like Ideal’s 42-inch Daddy’s Girl — to adult-figured fashion dolls. But the whole market was in the midst of a shakeup.

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Antique Q&A: 1920s Kammer & Reinhardt Doll

Q: My grandmother left this little doll. We would like to know something about it. I was told to look on the back of the head for information. It is incised with a “K” and “R” on each side of a six-pointed star, the letters “S&H,” and the number 23. Can you tell me anything about her? Does she have any value?

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