What's an Anthro?
Written by Carie Ferg   

Ball-jointed doll (BJD) designers (and collectors) are famous for pushing boundaries and redefining norms in the doll world. One example of that is the facet of BJDs growing in popularity which are anthropomorphic in nature.

Ball-jointed doll (BJD) designers (and collectors) are famous for pushing boundaries and redefining norms in the doll world. One example of that is the facet of BJDs growing in popularity which are anthropomorphic in nature. By definition “anthropomorphic” means “ascribing human form or attributes to a being or thing not human …” (www.dictionary.com). In BJD-land that’s manifesting itself in creatures that are not quite human-like, but also not entirely animal renderings either. They’re called “anthros” for short and more and more doll companies are offering their take on the whimsical “dolls” to collectors.

Do you like them? Do you hate them? I wonder what in our social-economic climate right now has

precipitated these interesting, evocative works?


Check out Pipos’ anthros and see what you think!

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Anthro dolls have been around for a long time (Mickey Mouse is just one that comes to mind), so it's not surprising to see BJD anthros on the market. I'm a big fan of them. Especially love the mignonette sized Catsy by Elfoll. Pigs make cute ones, as well, like Elfdoll's Alice Cherry Blossom and Charles Creature Cabinet's black pig, Ophelia Licorice. There seems to be a lot of cats and bunnies out there but if you like dogs, bats, mice or even hippos - well, you name it and most are now available, too.
Susan , January 01, 2010

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